Entries Tagged as 'Identity Theft'

Criminal Justice Department? What?

So I ran across this website running an ad on becoming a CIA agent. Amusingly, I remembered back in college days when I was accepted to be a CIA intern, but couldn’t even get in with the FBI because of my grades. I suppose computer skills were more important than grades at the time with the CIA.

In any case, so knowing that there are GPA requirements to join certain agencies, I thought it was amusing that there was a site that was offering financial aid to become one, and on top of that was basically saying that you could join in 18 to 24 months. I could be wrong, but I’m pretty sure it depends on a lot of qualifications and all sorts of things.

So I looked it up and the site happens to be off a .org TLD. I could be wrong, but I have never seen any federal government agency use a .org TLD ever. In fact, this is registered to someone that’s using a domain proxy which means that it’s probably a private individual. On top of that, they want to see if you qualify for financial aid. Someone is trying to get personal data for financial aid? Sounds awfully like a phishing scam. Now, like I said, it might be legit. But all indications seem to point to the fact that it isn’t when you get right down to it.

Scary stuff. And this is from a legitimate ad. Caveat emptor.

Be Wary in Job Searches

Maximizing Your Job Search Workshop
Image by danieljohnsonjr via Flickr

If you’re one of the many that are searching for positions on the Internet and probably sending your resume along on those job sites, be wary. One of the latest scams that has been broadcast in the past six months through security firms has been an increase in identity theft through job postings.

Think about it. You’re desperate to become employed again, you hand over your social security number, name, address, and all sorts of other identification materials to a “potential” employer just to realize that they don’t exist. My suggestion? Do your homework.

While you might not stop every sort of theft, providing due diligence will greatly decrease the risk of being taken for a ride. See if that person actually represents the company that they claim they are. Are they overseas and using a local number to contact you? Do they represent a placement agency? Perhaps you’ve never even heard of this business that they claim is several miles from your house and it’s not in the phone book. There are always signs to these sorts of scams.

If you don’t, you take a great risk. If you do, you minimize that risk. And best of luck on your search.

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