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FAA Still Denies Cell Phones in Air

Cell Phones Everywhere
Image by Scott Ableman via Flickr

The FAA is still denying that cell phones are safe in the air.   While it’s true that cell phones do generate electromagnetic signals, it’s also true that the signal of the EM field dramatically drops off as you get farther away from the user.  Most do not generate any substantial field outside of the “personal space” of the cell phone user.   If you don’t believe this, go buy a EM reader and give it a shot.   It’s rather interesting on the non-linear drop.

On top of this, it was shown on Mythbusters (episode 49) a while back that cell phones do not interfere with the navigational equipment of a plane unless the plane has unshielded wiring.  And believe me, if you’re running faulty wiring, the least of your worries will be coming from mobile devices.

I will agree that banning cell phone use on a plane for sake of safety is a cop out play when in reality, the only thing that cell phones are in the air would probably be the annoyance factor.   Due to the background noise of the plane, people that talk loudly already would just raise their voices.   And the last thing most passengers want to to is to be locked in a confined space with a bunch of shouting business people that are trying to conduct business.

Fortunately, I have a solution for this.   If someone has enough change to spare that they’re willing to sign an agreement before the flight takes off to have a decibel monitor on them, and their credit card on file, then if their voice ever goes above a certain level, they’re automatically fined.  This fine is then distributed to both the flight crew, airline, and passengers on board guided by the fact that since everyone will be annoyed, you might as well be compensated for the annoyance.

This would either prevent people from calling as much on flights, or keep their voices down of which they should be doing anyways.   While policing the airwaves at thirty thousand feet isn’t something fun, use the right reasoning.   I mean, let’s be honest.   If people can use cell phones when they “touch down” on the landing, then it would also be safe to say that those EM transmissions would not effect other instruments.  Or else every time you land, you’d see a blip in your flight instruments that would be visible to the naked eye.

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Strange Waitress Behaviors

I have to say that the last two times I’ve been out to dinner with my wife, it’s been a rather strange experience. Both times, I was asked whether or not we wanted separate checks. What’s weird is that I’m getting the strange feeling that this could be the fact that we’re a mixed couple and people make assumptions that apparently that doesn’t exist in the South.

How odd is that? I can’t think of any other reason that you’d ask whether or not someone wanted separate checks. Usually, people ask, but both times at different restaurants, the waitresses offered up the option right away.

For some odd reason, I haven’t been able to justify it by any other means, and giving benefit of the doubt. It just doesn’t make any logical sense unless you throw race into play. While I know that these tendencies still exist, it’s usually strange to see it so blatantly. But really, why am I not surprised at all…

China Domain Scams

I have to say that it’s very amusing when you get emails like this. I had to do a little bit of digging to get the dirt on it, but fortunately when you’re not the first of these types of scams, the Internet can be a great resource. Basically, the idea is no different than the domain snail mail letters that people send in the mail that look like a bill in the US. This takes a different approach, since it makes you scared that your brand is in jeopardy and you didn’t buy up some of the other domains.

The below was a verbatim email that I got from the scammers. I had started a dialogue in my usual manners, but was fascinated when they basically said that they were doing due diligence, but then they could not deny the application by the other corporation even though they were doing due diligence.

Hmm, makes you wonder. What’s the point of doing due diligence then?

If you ask about it, then they’ll send you a cost sheet, and it’s like $60-$120 per brand and domain. Amusingly, these same domains cost somewhere around $10 to $30USD depending on what they were, and a lot of them, you have to show registration of a legitimate business within that domain. For example, in Hong Kong and Taiwan, you have to have a registered business within those regions to actually even apply for the .com.tw and .com.hk. I don’t know about China, but in all honesty, it’s not something that I would care to register as a business owner. In the end, the .com is king and anyone in the web world knows that.

This happened to come from a site called “drc-asia.org” which claims to be a domain registrar in China. Interestingly enough if you look up the domain itself, it’s owned by “shanghaifengwangwangluokejiyouxiangongsi”. Which is fine in itself, except for the fact that they have a .live.cn (Hotmail China) email registration. Crazy thing here, but legitimate businesses never have domains registered under any personal email places. No hotmail, gmail, or anything else. Much less when a domain registrar doesn’t know how to set up a CNAMEs so that drc-asia.org doesn’t point anywhere, but www.drc-asia.org actually does go to a host? Come on.

In any case, if you find yourself worried that you might be on the verge of getting taken in, fear not. Usually it’s a permutation of the email below.


(If you are not the person who is in charge of this, please forward to the right person/ department, as this is urgent, thank you!)

Dear CEO,

We are the department of registration service in China. we have something need to confirm with you. We formally received an application on Aug 16, 2010, One company which self-styled " dre&y trading ltd" are applying to register "merchantsmirror" as brand name and domain names as below :
merchantsmirror.asia
merchantsmirror.cn
merchantsmirror.com.cn
merchantsmirror.com.hk
merchantsmirror.com.tw
merchantsmirror.hk
merchantsmirror.tw
After our initial checking, we found the brand name and these domain names being applied are as same as your company's, so we need to get the confirmation from your company. If the aforesaid company is your business partner or your subsidiary company, please don't reply us, we will approve the application automatically.

If you have no any relationship with this company, please contact us within 7 workdays. If out of the deadline, we will approve the application submitted by "dre&y trading ltd" unconditionally.

Best regards,
Robert Yang

How Does TSA Take to “Paperless Boarding Passes”?

Boarding pass
Image by Simon Aughton via Flickr

Interestingly enough, there’s this new fun little thing that the TSA is pushing which really shows that they’re actually with the times.   While most people still use the paper boarding passes, you can now have it sent to your phone.   What it does, is that it actually sends you an image of a QR code I believe, of which is then scanned at the TSA checkpoint.   They use one of the red bar code scanners so it doesn’t really get effected as much by the reflective screens on smart phones.

What’s neat about this technology isn’t just because it’s “green” since there’s no paper, but the fact that the government is finally getting on board the technology train WHILE it’s going.   Not like ten years behind.  Usually you don’t see things like that except in military and advanced research labs.   I find that absolutely fascinating.

While I had the opportunity to use it more recently, I was hesitant mainly because I didn’t want to hassle with it if there were airports that had screeners that were not trained to actually deal with the passes.  Even if the airlines are pushing it, it doesn’t necessarily mean there are untrained staff out there.  So I decided to observe and see for myself.

It happened that there was one lady in front of me at Newark that used this system.  It was actually very quick and easy and definitely put my mind at ease that perhaps this is the next thing I’ll adopt while I travel.  Nothing like getting rid of the abundance of boarding passes that one has to carry these days along with all of the advertisements and the weather and what not.  In all honesty, while it seemed like a pretty good idea, I usually am annoyed that they print all my boarding passes on separate pages with a bunch of junk on them.   Just print them all on one page!

I’m actually pretty happy that so far my observation of the paperless boarding pass has been a great experience.

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Android Market Comments Need Moderation

Android Market
Image via Wikipedia

Google needs to step up to the plate when it comes to moderating Android Market comments.  Overall, the ratings system is pretty typical.  If you like a product, you rate it high, if you dislike you rate it low.  There’s some trolls when it comes to ratings, but it’s actually not all that bad for the most part.  The good stuff still tends to float to the top.

But lately, there’s been a rash of really annoying 5-star comments that I mark as spam all the time and keep seeing everywhere.   Subscription services are going around and posting comments everywhere and basically saying how it’s this website has all of the apps for a monthly subscription and it’s cheaper, and all that.  Extremely annoying when you’re trying to read about whether or not an app works or not and what problems they might encounter.

Think of the commenting system as a user review board.   I mean, overall, the goal is to be like Amazon’s product reviews where people tend to use these days as a secondary source of “real people-real reviews” type of place outside of reading Consumer Reports.   Since Android Market doesn’t have a Consumer Reports, you’ll just have to settle for trial and error, and user reviews.  Unfortunately, on a mobile interface, spam type comments not only take up space, but it throws the review off.   Especially these types of subscription services.

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