Using yum to upgrade Fedora

When you run servers that happen to run on Redhat’s open source versions (called Fedora), you’ll get thrown into the dark ages at the rates that they release version numbers. Fortunately there’s a way to upgrade through the versions as long as you have the time and a console connection.
To upgrade from Fedora 7 to Fedora 8, just follow this tutorial. Similarly, follow this tutorial to upgrade from Fedora 8 to Fedora 9.
It’s pretty much the same upgrade procedures, where you use yum to check and make sure that all of the upgrade files are going without crashing dependencies. If there are dependencies, then you would use yum to install those first, then run the upgrades again. And I can guarantee that these procedures work even though it takes a bit of time. I remotely upgraded a server at work from Fedora 6 all the way to Fedora 9 (current version) going through this process. And it runs just dandy right now on FC9. yum.

  • http://triadfreedom.blogspot.com/ TriadFreedom

    How is Fedora 9? havent used fedora since 6, been on the ubuntu train, running mandriva on a couple servers, and one suse box, lost touch with the redhat gang when they left the community behind. Supposedly, this is back to the old same gang with fedora, and has gotten better. Maybe time to have another look…

  • http://triadfreedom.blogspot.com TriadFreedom

    How is Fedora 9? havent used fedora since 6, been on the ubuntu train, running mandriva on a couple servers, and one suse box, lost touch with the redhat gang when they left the community behind. Supposedly, this is back to the old same gang with fedora, and has gotten better. Maybe time to have another look…

  • http://www.merchantsmirror.com Ben Hwang

    The only reason I use Fedora for work, is because the guy that installed it locally only had a Fedora disk. Truthfully, from a console perspective, it’s all the same to me.
    FC9 looks pretty much like RedHat (any version)+, except these days you use yum instead to upgrade and the services are all the same still.
    Personally, I’m actually fond of the Debian installs because they’re rather small for server side, but it’s not a huge deal either way. This box itself has a 500G data partition and we’re basically using it as a statistical analysis trend machine along with data storage. So there’s no X, no crazy stuff. In that sense, pretty much any *nix box will do.
    If you’re looking for workstation wise, I actually stick with Ubuntu based on usability. I’ve heard some decent things about FC9, but then again, FC has in the past been a fairly bloated distribution.

  • darkmoon

    The only reason I use Fedora for work, is because the guy that installed it locally only had a Fedora disk. Truthfully, from a console perspective, it’s all the same to me.
    FC9 looks pretty much like RedHat (any version)+, except these days you use yum instead to upgrade and the services are all the same still.
    Personally, I’m actually fond of the Debian installs because they’re rather small for server side, but it’s not a huge deal either way. This box itself has a 500G data partition and we’re basically using it as a statistical analysis trend machine along with data storage. So there’s no X, no crazy stuff. In that sense, pretty much any *nix box will do.
    If you’re looking for workstation wise, I actually stick with Ubuntu based on usability. I’ve heard some decent things about FC9, but then again, FC has in the past been a fairly bloated distribution.