Is converting to Mac all that difficult?

Interesting that a good friend of mine has been wondering if she should go to a Mac. Apparently the difficulty lies in the software support and price.
Amusingly enough, I have to say that while my business partner, John (mentioned in her post) has told her she doesn’t need one, I’m more hesitant to make that call. I have to say that as a web designer, there are very many people out there that are in the same business that swear by Mac. While I haven’t been in the same business for a while, I do have all of the tools that I need. In fact, there really hasn’t been any need for me to boot up my Windows partition in Parallels except for Internet Explorer testing.
Have I ever looked back? Not a chance. Mac has the best of both a simplified interface and a useful integration. Coda has been my development tool for websites, and I’ve used all sorts of othere types of graphical programs instead of going to the normal Adobe suite. Office suite has been replaced by NeoOffice.
Would I miss Windows at all? I suppose years ago, when i still played around with PC gaming, that would have been my one drawback. But when my corporation bought my
MacBook Pro
, I was extremely overjoyed. And that’s the only system I use on a regular basis now.
I suppose need basis, there is a reason why I would stick with a PC rather than a Mac. But you do get what you pay for. Macs are very well built and their AppleCare warranty is pretty amazing. Along with the fact that soon there will be an Apple Store nearby, it just makes things a lot easier overall. Might be an expensive purchase, but I have yet to see someone regret buying one and regret a conversion from the PC.

  • I admit my iMac isn’t the machine it once was and the old G3 processors aren’t quite as quick as they once were but it’s only 10 years old.

  • I admit my iMac isn’t the machine it once was and the old G3 processors aren’t quite as quick as they once were but it’s only 10 years old.

  • The choice really isn’t difficult at all when you factor your time into the decision. If you’re time is worth money, then a Mac is a no brainer. In the over ten years I’ve been using macs, I can count the hours I’ve spent reinstalling my OS on one hand. I’ve never had a virus, never had spyware, never a trojan horse or adware on my Mac. Ever.
    I know people who own PC’s who re-install Windows at least 3-6 times a year. Read that again. 3-6 times *a year*. Sorry folks, but there is a better way and it’s called Macintosh.

  • The choice really isn’t difficult at all when you factor your time into the decision. If you’re time is worth money, then a Mac is a no brainer. In the over ten years I’ve been using macs, I can count the hours I’ve spent reinstalling my OS on one hand. I’ve never had a virus, never had spyware, never a trojan horse or adware on my Mac. Ever.
    I know people who own PC’s who re-install Windows at least 3-6 times a year. Read that again. 3-6 times *a year*. Sorry folks, but there is a better way and it’s called Macintosh.

  • I should probably throw in a couple of additional notes here… to qualify my advice.
    I’m a long time PC user… and a Linux Fanatic. I’ve been using OSX since I bought my first mac mini about 3 years ago (when they first came out).
    I do like OSX. I’m using it to type this message on my Macbook Pro.
    The deal is that with Sue’s situation she has little or no experience with it… and she has EXTENSIVE experience with windows. She’s committed to the Windows platform on her desktop which she won’t be getting rid of anytime soon. The new computer is for travel.
    The main trick is that in this example with the experience on the other platform, the money invested in Windows versions of software, and the learning curve for Mac OSX I recommended against it.
    If you say there isn’t a learning curve then you obviously have been using it for too long. It may be easier, but having to unlearn the old way and relearn the new way is also time costly… and more frustrating that re-installing the OS to some folks.
    I went mac b/c I don’t like Windows, but my primary machine is actually still Linux, not OSX, because the tools I use simply work better on Linux.
    Now, bring on the rants.

  • I should probably throw in a couple of additional notes here… to qualify my advice.
    I’m a long time PC user… and a Linux Fanatic. I’ve been using OSX since I bought my first mac mini about 3 years ago (when they first came out).
    I do like OSX. I’m using it to type this message on my Macbook Pro.
    The deal is that with Sue’s situation she has little or no experience with it… and she has EXTENSIVE experience with windows. She’s committed to the Windows platform on her desktop which she won’t be getting rid of anytime soon. The new computer is for travel.
    The main trick is that in this example with the experience on the other platform, the money invested in Windows versions of software, and the learning curve for Mac OSX I recommended against it.
    If you say there isn’t a learning curve then you obviously have been using it for too long. It may be easier, but having to unlearn the old way and relearn the new way is also time costly… and more frustrating that re-installing the OS to some folks.
    I went mac b/c I don’t like Windows, but my primary machine is actually still Linux, not OSX, because the tools I use simply work better on Linux.
    Now, bring on the rants.