Why universal healthcare is evil

As a young American, I hear all the time about how Social Security won’t exist by the time I’m old.
Why is that? Because middle class America would front the bill and it happens to be a flawed concept. Why should working individuals pay for healthcare of the elderly of society? Shouldn’t it be a “put it away for when you’re old” concept? In any case, we’re probably in it for the worst.
Now there’s all this talk about universal healthcare. Again.
First, let’s take a look at who benefits from this. The pharmaceutical industry along with the insurance industry. What better way to get people hooked on their products, than to mandate a universal policy. Big Pharma? Benefit. Big Insurance? Benefit. Illegal immigrants? Benefit. Low income? Benefit. Middle class? Eh. What benefit?
The fact is: you’ll be paying premiums that would probably double what you do now, for the same care. Mainly because there just isn’t enough money to go around so the biggest group of payers will pay the most. That’s us. Middle class America. And frankly with my premiums having raised in the last five years probably 50-75%, I’m not looking to shell out anymore to the insurance industry when there is no benefit to me at all. And to boot, I have probably one of the better corporate healthcare plans out there. I hate to see what others have been paying in the last five years.
So how is this any better than Social Security? I’m paying for other people that does not directly benefit me. In fact, it doesn’t even indirectly benefit me. It’s a very poorly thought out plan that on paper, is ideal and wonderful but in reality, has plenty of loopholes for big businesses to reap in billions.
I really can’t see this as a good platform to stand on for politics. It’s happened every four years, and I can’t see it ever happening here unless you want to destroy the middle class as we know it. Perhaps that’s the goal. Who knows. In any case, all I can say is that based on what I know and what I pay, there is no way I’d support anyone that campaigns for it.

  • The facts do not support your argument on healthcare costs, which are lower in other countries that have better outcomes than the U.S.
    http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/2006/12/30/business/31view.L.jpg
    Be careful about swallowing all the doom and gloom on Social Security, too.

  • The facts do not support your argument on healthcare costs, which are lower in other countries that have better outcomes than the U.S.
    http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/2006/12/30/business/31view.L.jpg
    Be careful about swallowing all the doom and gloom on Social Security, too.

  • Ben: Good post. Two observations.
    1. Social Security is completely different than health care. Social Security is a good concept that originated in the 19th century in Europe so that people who worked in factories their entire lives didn’t have to starve to death in the cold once they were too old to work any more.
    If someone wants to opt out of it, I think they should be allowed to, but it is a good thing for society IMHO.
    2. I’m glad you see universal health care in such a negative light. It would, in fact, likely damage the economy and hurt the middle class. Pro-socialists like to point to nice graphics that compare apples and oranges. But I know some people who live in Canada and I asked one of them last week about the issue and he said: Canadian health care sucks because all their good doctors go to America where they can make good money. If you go to the emergency room and aren’t bleeding from an amputated arm or something you will never be seen. He also said that while their prescription drugs were somewhat cheaper, he pointed to the fact that their car insurance rates were two or three times our average.
    Sometimes it pays to ask people about the reality of their surroundings.

  • Ben: Good post. Two observations.
    1. Social Security is completely different than health care. Social Security is a good concept that originated in the 19th century in Europe so that people who worked in factories their entire lives didn’t have to starve to death in the cold once they were too old to work any more.
    If someone wants to opt out of it, I think they should be allowed to, but it is a good thing for society IMHO.
    2. I’m glad you see universal health care in such a negative light. It would, in fact, likely damage the economy and hurt the middle class. Pro-socialists like to point to nice graphics that compare apples and oranges. But I know some people who live in Canada and I asked one of them last week about the issue and he said: Canadian health care sucks because all their good doctors go to America where they can make good money. If you go to the emergency room and aren’t bleeding from an amputated arm or something you will never be seen. He also said that while their prescription drugs were somewhat cheaper, he pointed to the fact that their car insurance rates were two or three times our average.
    Sometimes it pays to ask people about the reality of their surroundings.

  • Ed – The graph you linked proves nothing except that we pay for higher costs and have lower quality. Given everything else on how American corporations interact versus other corporations, your graph just proves that it’ll go south before it goes north. We’re paying for more, and there’s no doubt we’ll pay for more later regardless. Look at cellular packages where it’s almost monopolized. Look at gasoline or big oil. Cable television? Rate hikes everywhere. Never a rate decrease. So you expect me to believe that universal health care will give me better coverage for less money? Give me a break.
    Gloom and doom of Social Security? I pay for your generation right? Why? From a logic perspective, that’s the stupidest and most ridiculous finance method ever. It was doomed from the get-go except for the first generation.
    Jeff – It’s funny because Ed’s shown me that graph before and yet I have large extended and fairly well-off family in Vancouver (as I’ve told him before) along with many friends in the Toronto area. What do they say about the health care? It sucks compared to US. I’ve never heard one good word. Of course, as far as we can tell, the graph shown is taken from data just like Nielsen Ratings rate television. And we all know how correct Nielsen is at judging what you want to watch.

  • darkmoon

    Ed – The graph you linked proves nothing except that we pay for higher costs and have lower quality. Given everything else on how American corporations interact versus other corporations, your graph just proves that it’ll go south before it goes north. We’re paying for more, and there’s no doubt we’ll pay for more later regardless. Look at cellular packages where it’s almost monopolized. Look at gasoline or big oil. Cable television? Rate hikes everywhere. Never a rate decrease. So you expect me to believe that universal health care will give me better coverage for less money? Give me a break.
    Gloom and doom of Social Security? I pay for your generation right? Why? From a logic perspective, that’s the stupidest and most ridiculous finance method ever. It was doomed from the get-go except for the first generation.
    Jeff – It’s funny because Ed’s shown me that graph before and yet I have large extended and fairly well-off family in Vancouver (as I’ve told him before) along with many friends in the Toronto area. What do they say about the health care? It sucks compared to US. I’ve never heard one good word. Of course, as far as we can tell, the graph shown is taken from data just like Nielsen Ratings rate television. And we all know how correct Nielsen is at judging what you want to watch.

  • Brenda Bowers

    Ben how right on you are about both systems! But if you have been following my blogs at all you know how I feel about both Social Security, Medicare and now the universal care people are screaming for because Medicare is not destroying the Middle class, it already has destroyed the Middle Class! Young people are carrying a huge burden to support the greedy geezers. Yes I am one and I should not be receiving Medicare or Social Security. And, if my money had not been taken away from me for this damned pyramid scheme in the first place I would and millions of other would not be. As it is there are millions of older people who are well off enough not to need these benefits but who take full advantage of them and would scream their greedy guts out if they were forced to pay their own way. People have asked me if I feel this way then why don’t I opt out, like no one is saying I have to accept the checks or medical. No, I don’t have to take them, but since my grandchildren are going to be on poverty row or homeless because their parents and they are having to shell out for the useless in society it behooves me to take what the government has offered me of my children’s and grandchildren’s hard earned dollars and save it for them when they will without a doubt need.
    We as a decent society should and in fact must care for the needy. But the useless greedy grabbers should be cut off at the knees. The argument Ed Cone and the other non=thinkers offers is as you have seen a pathetic ploy and simply inaccurate. Canadians and Europeans who really need care and can afford it come to the United States to get it before they die, otherwise they are on a waiting list until they die off of it. No problem, and no stats as to how many of these people there are.
    Keep thinking straight and please speak out when you have the chance to other young people who are being forced to carry this load and therefore will someday see themselves as having been made the victims of these “thinkers”. Dear Lord, but I get so mad when this topic comes up! BB

  • Brenda Bowers

    Ben how right on you are about both systems! But if you have been following my blogs at all you know how I feel about both Social Security, Medicare and now the universal care people are screaming for because Medicare is not destroying the Middle class, it already has destroyed the Middle Class! Young people are carrying a huge burden to support the greedy geezers. Yes I am one and I should not be receiving Medicare or Social Security. And, if my money had not been taken away from me for this damned pyramid scheme in the first place I would and millions of other would not be. As it is there are millions of older people who are well off enough not to need these benefits but who take full advantage of them and would scream their greedy guts out if they were forced to pay their own way. People have asked me if I feel this way then why don’t I opt out, like no one is saying I have to accept the checks or medical. No, I don’t have to take them, but since my grandchildren are going to be on poverty row or homeless because their parents and they are having to shell out for the useless in society it behooves me to take what the government has offered me of my children’s and grandchildren’s hard earned dollars and save it for them when they will without a doubt need.
    We as a decent society should and in fact must care for the needy. But the useless greedy grabbers should be cut off at the knees. The argument Ed Cone and the other non=thinkers offers is as you have seen a pathetic ploy and simply inaccurate. Canadians and Europeans who really need care and can afford it come to the United States to get it before they die, otherwise they are on a waiting list until they die off of it. No problem, and no stats as to how many of these people there are.
    Keep thinking straight and please speak out when you have the chance to other young people who are being forced to carry this load and therefore will someday see themselves as having been made the victims of these “thinkers”. Dear Lord, but I get so mad when this topic comes up! BB