OpenDNS revisited

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It’s been almost five months since we last looked at OpenDNS. A recap of the services. OpenDNS tracks domains and blacklists of known phishing sites. In fact, they have but recently opened Phishtank, where users introduce and peer review sites for phishing.
The domain name servers they provide are free of use (as they should be), but there’s a great service on top of it. You’re less likely to get hit by a phishing site. If there is a site that doesn’t exist, then they will open up a “OpenDNS” page that says it wasn’t found and will give you the next couple of sites that are closest. If there is a definite screw up, then you can report it and they will update their systems once they have checked and made sure the site is legitimate.
It’s definitely one of those useful things to configure your parents’ routers to when they’re not as tech friendly and are in a habit of clicking on every picture or tempting advertisement they see. The folks at OpenDNS definitely have provided a great service for everyone.

  • I do like the theory that goes behind OpenDNS. I believe it is a great idea for anyone that uses the internet and wants to avoid all kinds of phishing scams. My issue is that what if someone edits the DNS entries in OpenDNS and changes something like etrade to phishing sites. Without some assurance from a 3rd party security firm, i dunno if i can trust using it for private secure transactions.

  • I do like the theory that goes behind OpenDNS. I believe it is a great idea for anyone that uses the internet and wants to avoid all kinds of phishing scams. My issue is that what if someone edits the DNS entries in OpenDNS and changes something like etrade to phishing sites. Without some assurance from a 3rd party security firm, i dunno if i can trust using it for private secure transactions.

  • You do realize that OpenDNS is operated by corporation and thereby is under scrutiny right? There’s no different from running their DNS services or under the ones any other ISP. Technically, there isn’t anything stopping any administrator at any ISP to re-edit domains to point to phishing sites.
    Of course, that’d also lead to some felonies if I’m not mistaken, so I don’t see why anyone would even bother to do that after plastering their faces on their website.

  • darkmoon

    You do realize that OpenDNS is operated by corporation and thereby is under scrutiny right? There’s no different from running their DNS services or under the ones any other ISP. Technically, there isn’t anything stopping any administrator at any ISP to re-edit domains to point to phishing sites.
    Of course, that’d also lead to some felonies if I’m not mistaken, so I don’t see why anyone would even bother to do that after plastering their faces on their website.