When customer service reaps rewards

Those that know of Firelace (a startup that ratchet and I began), would know that the couple of current customers we have, we strive our best to be available at pretty much all hours and have a quick turn-around time. But this goes without saying that the same should be said about large corporations. Jeff Jarvis posts on Buzzmachine that Dell’s reaping what it sowed with the national attention of bad customer service. Yet, Target, Starbucks and some other customer-aimed service have tremendous customer loyalty.
Now isn’t this just common sense? You slap your customer in the face, and you expect good loyalty? Come on.


As an entrepeneur, I have to always keep in mind where I started and where the management team needs to end. You know the old adage that says, “The customer is always right?” Well, everyone knows that they’re not always right, but it’s also part of the business to have a buffer zone where you give some to make people happy.
I can guarantee with the latest boxing of the ears of AOL’s customer service from the recorded message that’s been going around the Internet in storm, they’re not ones to have learned this lesson. Press releases and public relations are usually not the answer. Just by giving someone a canned speech about something will not get you any customer respect. But treating them with a human interaction, that’s non-corporate… that’s how you gain the grassroots love. And with that grassroots love, you gain power to reach an audience beyond your wildest imagination.
Scoble wrote about reaching for grassroots to his latest on how to remake Microsoft’s image. But this goes without saying that this is the reason why people fight large franchises and support mom-and-pop shops. Biggest reason here? The latter cares. Even if they didn’t, they give off the impression they do, because of the type of support you gain. And as customers, we appreciate that to no end.
Learn from these lessons on why the little guy can still succeed against the big guy. They might seem like common sense to most, but strangely enough, common sense is a rarity in the upper crust of corporate management.

  • That’s not really that big of news. Every single vendor pulls that one. Every corporation that has more than 100 employees basically pays all sorts of “extra” cost. I’m not exactly sure why that is, and I’ve questioned it before, but I’m told that “the more you buy, the less it gets.” Umm… as a large corporation, don’t you already buy more than the small guy? Uhh yeah.
    If you want to see rip-off, go look into any large corporation’s travel planner and compare the “SAME” ticket from point A-to-B and see the weird price difference.

  • darkmoon

    That’s not really that big of news. Every single vendor pulls that one. Every corporation that has more than 100 employees basically pays all sorts of “extra” cost. I’m not exactly sure why that is, and I’ve questioned it before, but I’m told that “the more you buy, the less it gets.” Umm… as a large corporation, don’t you already buy more than the small guy? Uhh yeah.
    If you want to see rip-off, go look into any large corporation’s travel planner and compare the “SAME” ticket from point A-to-B and see the weird price difference.