VoIP telecommunications for about $6000

VoIP has been around for ages. Those of you that have browsed through Net2Phone, and even newer technologies such as Skype know how far it’s come. Even Vonage and Packet8 are basing their business models purely on the basis of VoIP technology.
Perhaps it’s time to take it one step further. Asterisk has been around the open-source community for a while now. The model itself is basically an open-source VoIP server, where all the costs lies in the hardware. Being that this system can support up to 72 telephony devices and and up to 23 simultaneous PSTN connections, this could be the wave of the future for rural telcommunications. All of this in a 1U chassis.
This perhaps isn’t the way to combat Bellsouth and other big telcos, but it definitely offers an alternative solution for rural communities that need a technology savings.
Slashdot driven off a ZDNet article.


Personal note: Have I drooled over this technology? A long time ago, and now I’ve stopped. However, I grant you permission to drool over it since it has finally hit mainstream media. Hallelujah.

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