Weaver kids brighten technological future

Fair Warning: This has been on my mind for a long time, and it’s not meant to demean or offend anyone. If you easily take offense to this topic, don’t read my rant. Otherwise, continue on…
Personal rant:
I had the pleasure of meeting a few of the students from Weaver Academy, when I guest lectured for the CYBERGUARD Project. Apparently, the Project is well-taken by the school in beta, and they’re asking for Phase II to be guest-lectured once a month also (details are sketchy right now). I now understand why my good friend Sue got RedHat Academy for this kids. They’re A-M-A-Z-I-N-G.


I’ve been reading a couple of the student blogs, and you would not believe the depth and perception that these kids have and the ability to write. The technology kids are also so bright that they remind me of myself when I was that age. I wanted to learn everything, break everything, and rebuild it again. Makes me feel old when I remember learning Pascal in two weeks and teaching my middle school teacher how to write certain functions.
I get a chance to speak to Adam Wenner every so often and believe me folks. I would trust this senior with any secure network I own, without batting an eyelash. There are others out there also, but these are the kids you have to throw your hopes and dreams at and hope they can run with them. These are the kids that you want in your businesses to drive forth technological innovations.
Technology is slowly dying. Computer Science isn’t what it used be back in the nineties. Information Technology is also dwindling with people that haven’t a clue about how to defend networks if you gave them a firewall without a GUI interface. You want tragedy? In an age where the United States is slowly dying of computer technology to Asia, all we have left is the Yankee ingenuity. Fortunately, kids like the Weaver students shine in the vast sea of darkness.
Adam and company, I wish you the best when you hit the collegiate level or wherever you’re going in a few years. The rest of you out there that have businesses, look out in a couple years. These kids will be your hirees or perhaps even competitors.
End Rant.

  • Sue

    Well, glad you blew your rant out loud. It’s so hard to be so smart, like you are. I don’t think the problem is ingenuity; I think it’s $$. Without it, the ingenious have to improvise with what they have. Kudos to those who don’t lose their minds in that environment. I have faith in my kids.

  • Sue

    Well, glad you blew your rant out loud. It’s so hard to be so smart, like you are. I don’t think the problem is ingenuity; I think it’s $$. Without it, the ingenious have to improvise with what they have. Kudos to those who don’t lose their minds in that environment. I have faith in my kids.

  • thanx ben, now if only we could convince guilford county schools to let us help out admin that network
    –adam

  • thanx ben, now if only we could convince guilford county schools to let us help out admin that network
    –adam

  • darkmoon

    *laugh* in regards to ingenuity, that’s really all that’s left. Of course, we as Americans did it upon ourselves by boosting our economic value. But truthfully, look at it this way: We created the television. The Japanese and the Koreans have taken that and ran with it. Who wants an RCA when they can have a Sony or even a Nakamichi? Innovation rules over creation, hands down.
    It’s also because we’re never ready to take the steps for calculated risks. Our SLTs (senior leadership teams) are too comfortable and not willing to take a pay cut when there is something new to try.
    I’m all for Weaver kids running the Weaver network. It would definitely be an interesting cooperative between GCS IT and Weaver. I’d love to see it happen although I have a feeling it would not. Amusingly enough, that would help so much with the “short-handed staff” problem…

  • darkmoon

    *laugh* in regards to ingenuity, that’s really all that’s left. Of course, we as Americans did it upon ourselves by boosting our economic value. But truthfully, look at it this way: We created the television. The Japanese and the Koreans have taken that and ran with it. Who wants an RCA when they can have a Sony or even a Nakamichi? Innovation rules over creation, hands down.
    It’s also because we’re never ready to take the steps for calculated risks. Our SLTs (senior leadership teams) are too comfortable and not willing to take a pay cut when there is something new to try.
    I’m all for Weaver kids running the Weaver network. It would definitely be an interesting cooperative between GCS IT and Weaver. I’d love to see it happen although I have a feeling it would not. Amusingly enough, that would help so much with the “short-handed staff” problem…